Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Tips for Safe Internet Browsing

The Internet can be a dangerous place for those who are careless. Visit the wrong website and you can infect your computer with malicious software that will steal your data, or encrypt your data and demand a ransom for its return. We continually use the internet for our personal and business needs. Even though we are very comfortable using the internet, we cannot ignore basic internet safety rules. Here are some tips to help keep you safe when using the internet.
Keep Your Guard Up
Always be cautious about what you do online, which websites you visit, and what you share with/from others. Use comprehensive virus protection and malware protection software on your devices. Make sure you backup your data on a regular basis in case something bad happens to your device. Use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) when you are connecting to an unsecured WiFi network, such as from a library, coffee shop or other public place. By taking preventative measures, you can save yourself from issues that may arise later.

Use a Reputable Browser
Some browsers have implemented technology which checks the reputation of a website address before they allow the website to open in the browser. If the website’s reputation is bad, you’ll receive an alert from the browser. You can then choose not open the website or to proceed to the website. The best browsers for internet safety are:

Do Not Use the Browser's "Save Password" Option
A browser's built-in password manager is extremely convenient. This is the option when you enter a used ID & password on a web page, then the browser offers to save that information so you do not need to enter it again the next time you go to that website. However, this option is also insecure. This is an especially dangerous option when you are using a computer that is shared by others (at work or even at home with family), or via a laptop that may become lost or stolen. You can turn off a browser's save password option via the program's settings. If you want to save your IDs and passwords via a system, use a password protected file (e.g. Word, Excel, etc.) or an automated solution like LastPass.

Change Your Password After a Breach/Hack
A breach is when a website service you regularly use with a login (e.g. email, online banking, music or video streaming, online shopping, etc.) informs you that their system was hacked and it's likely your account ID and password was exposed. When alerted, change your password immediately and use a new password you never previously used. Actually, it's a sound practice to periodically change your account passwords - every 60-90 days is usually sufficient.

Turn on Two-Factor Authentication When Possible
Two-factor authentication is an extra layer of security designed to ensure that you're the only person who can access your account online, even if someone found out your password. It adds a quick extra step to your basic log-in procedure. The user ID and password is your first factor of authentication. Two-factor authentication adds a second level of authentication to an account login after you successfully enter your user ID and password. Examples of the second factor in two-factor authentication are:
  • Answer a set of challenge questions (e.g. What is the name of your first pet?).
  • The website you login to sends a text code to your cell phone. You then retrieve the code from the text message and enter that into the website's web page.
  • Connect a FOB or a bio-metric device (e.g. finger print scanner) to your computer, tablet ofrphone.

Only Visit Secure Websites
A secure website means all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted. Encryption helps to protect your data and identity from those trying to access your information while you are online. You can identify secure websites by looking for an address that starts with "https:" (the "s" stands for secure) rather than an address that simply starts with "http:". These websites may also be marked by a padlock icon next to the website address in the address bar, such as in this image:

Today, we use the internet for almost everything: We stay informed, do research, make connections, shop, do banking, play and work online. However in the digital world, internet safety should be on the top of everyone's mind. By exercising a bit of caution and being vigilant, you can stay safe and better protect your data while on the internet.


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4 comments:

  1. Thank you for the info, David.

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  2. This is a good article, David. Additionally, I think that setting up a personal firewall (e. g. Windows Defender, McAfee, etc.) is a good defensive step.

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  3. Great article David. Everyone should review these tips.

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  4. Some good tips David. Appreciated.

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